Top 16 of 2016: Book Culture on Columbus

2016 is coming to an end, and to celebrate we're taking a look back at our bestsellers of the year! Each of the following sixteen books was released, in either paperback or hardcover, within the past year. Make sure to check out the lists from Book Culture on Broadway and Book Culture 112th, too!

1. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London's West End on July 30, 2016. 
It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn't much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children. 
While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places. 

 

2. A Little Life
by Hanya Yanagihara

A Little Life follows four college classmates broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. While their relationships, which are tinged by addiction, success, and pride, deepen over the decades, the men are held together by their devotion to the brilliant, enigmatic Jude, a man scarred by an unspeakable childhood trauma. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara's stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves.

 

3. The Sympathizer
by Viet Thanh Nguyen

The winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, as well as six other awards, The Sympathizer is the breakthrough novel of the year. With the pace and suspense of a thriller and prose that has been compared to Graham Greene and Saul Bellow, The Sympathizer is a sweeping epic of love and betrayal. The narrator, a communist double agent, is a man of two minds, a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who arranges to come to America after the Fall of Saigon, and while building a new life with other Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles is secretly reporting back to his communist superiors in Vietnam. The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity and America, a gripping espionage novel, and a powerful story of love and friendship.

 

4. When Breath Becomes Air
by Paul Kalanthi

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade's worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi's transformation from a naive medical student possessed, as he wrote, by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. 

5. Sweetbitter
by Stephanie Danler

Twenty-two, and knowing no one, Tess leaves home to begin her adult life in New York City. Thus begins a year that is both enchanting and punishing, in a low-level job at the best restaurant in New York City. Grueling hours and a steep culinary learning curve awaken her to the beauty of oysters, the finest Champagnes, the appellations of Burgundy. At the same time, she opens herself to friendships and love set against the backdrop of dive bars and late nights. As her appetites sharpen for food and wine, but also for knowledge, experience, and belonging Tess is drawn into adarkly alluring love triangle that will prove to be her most exhilarating and painful lesson of all. 

 

6. The Girl on the Train
by Paula Hawkins

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She's even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life as she sees it is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. 
And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

 

7. The Underground Railroad
by Colson Whitehead

Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.
In Whitehead's ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar's first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city's placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.

 

8. The Sellout
by Paul Beatty

A biting satire about a young man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, Paul Beatty's The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. It challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father-son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality the black Chinese restaurant.

 

 

 

9. The Ramblers
by Aidan Donnelley Rowley

Set in the most magical parts of Manhattan the Upper West Side, Central Park, Greenwich Village The Ramblers explores the lives of three lost souls, bound together by friendship and family. During the course of one fateful Thanksgiving week, a time when emotions run high and being with family can be a mixed blessing, Rowley's sharply defined characters explore the moments when decisions are deliberately made, choices accepted, and pasts reconciled.

 

 

10. Hillbilly Elegy
by J.D. Vance

From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerfulaccount of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America's white working class
Hillbilly Elegyis a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

 

11. The Girls
by Emma Cline

Northern California, during the violent end of the 1960s. At the start of summer, a lonely and thoughtful teenager, Evie Boyd, sees a group of girls in the park, and is immediately caught by their freedom, their careless dress, their dangerous aura of abandon. Soon, Evie is in thrall to Suzanne, a mesmerizing older girl, and is drawn into the circle of a soon-to-be infamous cult and the man who is its charismatic leader. Hidden in the hills, their sprawling ranch is eerie and run down, but to Evie, it is exotic, thrilling, charged a place where she feels desperate to be accepted. As she spends more time away from her mother and the rhythms of her daily life, and as her obsession with Suzanne intensifies, Evie does not realize she is coming closer and closer to unthinkable violence. 
Emma Cline's remarkable debut novel is gorgeously written and spellbinding, with razor-sharp precision and startling psychological insight. The Girls is a brilliant work of fiction. 

 

12. Outline
by Rachel Cusk

Outline is a novel in ten conversations. Spare and lucid, it follows a novelist teaching a course in creative writing over an oppressively hot summer in Athens. She leads her students in storytelling exercises. She meets other visiting writers for dinner. She goes swimming in the Ionian Sea with her neighbor from the plane. The people she encounters speak volubly about themselves: their fantasies, anxieties, pet theories, regrets, and longings. And through these disclosures, a portrait of the narrator is drawn by contrast, a portrait of a woman learning to face a great loss.

 

 

13. Evicted
by Matthew Desmond

In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the $20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind. 
Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. 

 

 

14. Commonwealth
by Ann Patchett

The acclaimed, bestselling author winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize tells the enthralling story of how an unexpected romantic encounter irrevocably changes two families lives.
One Sunday afternoon in Southern California, Bert Cousins shows up at Franny Keating's christening party uninvited. Before evening falls, he has kissed Franny's mother, Beverly thus setting in motion the dissolution of their marriages and the joining of two families.

 

 

15. Hamilton: The Revolution
by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jeffrey Seller, and Jeremy McCarter

Lin-Manuel Miranda's groundbreaking musical "Hamilton" is as revolutionary as its subject, the poor kid from the Caribbean who fought the British, defended the Constitution, and helped to found the United States. Fusing hip-hop, pop, R&B, and the best traditions of theater, this once-in-a-generation show broadens the sound of Broadway, reveals the storytelling power of rap, and claims our country's origins for a diverse new generation. Hamilton: The Revolution gives readers an unprecedented view of both revolutions, from the only writers able to provide it. 

 

16. H is for Hawk
by Helen Macdonald

The instant New York Times bestseller and award-winning sensation, Helen Macdonald's story of adopting and raising one of nature's most vicious predators has soared into the hearts of millions of readers worldwide. Fierce and feral, her goshawk Mabel's temperament mirrors Helen's own state of grief after her father's death, and together raptor and human "discover the pain and beauty of being alive" (People). H Is for Hawk is a genre-defying debut from one of our most unique and transcendent voices.

 

 


 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - Parts One & Two: The Official Script Book of the Original West End Production Cover Image
Email or call for price.
ISBN: 9781338099133
Availability: Hard to Find
Published: Arthur A. Levine Books - July 31st, 2016

A Little Life Cover Image
$17.00
ISBN: 9780804172707
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Anchor Books - January 26th, 2016

The Sympathizer: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9780802124944
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Grove Press - April 12th, 2016

Sweetbitter Cover Image
$25.00
ISBN: 9781101875940
Availability: Not in Stock - Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Knopf Publishing Group - May 24th, 2016

The Girl on the Train Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781594634024
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Riverhead Books - July 12th, 2016

The Underground Railroad Cover Image
$26.95
ISBN: 9780385542364
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Doubleday Books - August 2nd, 2016

The Sellout Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781250083258
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Picador USA - March 1st, 2016

The Ramblers Cover Image
$15.99
ISBN: 9780062413321
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: William Morrow & Company - October 4th, 2016

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis Cover Image
$27.99
ISBN: 9780062300546
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Harper - June 28th, 2016

The Girls Cover Image
$27.00
ISBN: 9780812998603
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Random House - June 14th, 2016

Outline Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781250081544
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Picador USA - February 9th, 2016

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City Cover Image
$28.00
ISBN: 9780553447439
Availability: Not in Stock - Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Crown Publishing Group (NY) - March 1st, 2016

Commonwealth Cover Image
$27.99
ISBN: 9780062491794
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Harper - September 13th, 2016

Hamilton: The Revolution Cover Image
$45.00
ISBN: 9781455539741
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Grand Central Publishing - April 12th, 2016

H Is for Hawk Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9780802124739
Availability: On Our Shelves Now - Click Title to See Location Inventory.
Published: Grove Press - March 8th, 2016