Q & A

Q&A and Reading with Gregory Fletcher

On Sunday, March 8th, at 3pm Gregory Fletcher reads from his latest book, Shorts and Briefs: A Collection of Short Plays and Brief Principles of Playwriting.  Gregory Fletcher is a native of Dallas, Texas, a resident of New York City, a member of the Dramatists' Guild and Actors Equity Association, a graduate of California State University with a MA in Playwriting, and of Columbia University with an MFA in Directing. Composed of nine short plays and and brief principles of play writing, Shorts and Briefs is intended for actors, directors, and producers of the short play genre, both in and out of the classroom. 

Q&A and Reading with Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan

Ever wonder what the married of Kate Middleton and Prince William is like behind all the glam and glitz of royalty? Join authors Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan at Book Culture on Columbus this Tuesday at 7pm for the launch of their latest book, The Royal WeThe premise of The Royal We is simple: what if, rather than meeting Kate Middleton in college, the future king of England, has met an American foreign exchange student? Although inspired by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, The Royal We is very much its own story. Packed with fully-drawn characters that readers will absolutely fall in love with, relationships that feel real, authentic and relatable, this smartly-written story is pleasure-reading at its best.

Q&A and Reading with Honor Moore of Uptown Poets

Honor Moore’s most recent book is The Bishop’s Daughter, a memoir, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and a Los Angeles Times Favorite Book of the Year and her most recent collection of poems, Red Shoes.  Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The American Scholar, Salmagundi, The New Republic, Freeman’s and many other journals and anthologies.  For the Library of America, she edited Amy Lowell: Selected Poems and Poems from the Women’s Movement, an Oprah summer readings pick which is featured in the current documentary about American feminism, “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry.”  She has been poet in residence at Wesleyan and the University of Richmond, visiting professor at the Columbia School of the Arts and three times the Visiting Distinguished Writer in the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa. 

Q&A and Reading with James B. Nicola

As part of our ongoing celebration of National Poetry Month, we are excited to host the Poets of Other Persuasions poetry reading this Friday, April 17th, at 7pm. The event will feature readings by James B. Nicola, Alfred Encarnacion, Rachel Hadas, and Jennifer Michael Hecht.  Looking forward to the upcoming event, we interviewed James B. Nicola, author of Manhattan Plaza and Stage to Page: Poems from the Theater, which is scheduled for publication in 2016. A Yale grad and stage director by profession, Nicola's non-fiction book Playing the Audience won a Choice award. Also a composer, lyricist, and playwright, James’s children’s musical, Chimes: A Christ­mas Vaude­ville, premiered in Fairbanks, Alaska, where Santa Claus was rumored to be in attendance on opening night.

Q&A and Reading with Jessamyn Hope, author of "Safekeeping"

This Monday, June 15th, Jessamyn Hope (Safekeeping) and Jonathan Papernick (The Book of Stone) will read and discuss their recent novels.  We'd like to thank Jessamyn for taking the time to answer our Q&A and for sharing her work with us!
Jessamyn Hope grew up in Montreal and lived in Israel before moving to New York City. Her fiction and memoirs have appeared in Ploughshares, Five Points, Colorado Review, Descant, and PRISM international, among other literary magazines. She was the Susannah McCorkle Scholar in Fiction at the 2012 Sewanee Writers' Conference and has an M.F.A. in creative writing from Sarah Lawrence College. 

Q&A and Reading with Jonathan Papernick, author of "The Book of Stone"

This Monday, June 15th, at 7pm, Jessamyn Hope (Safekeeping), and Jonathan Papernick (The Book of Stone) will meet at Book Culture on Columbus to discuss their recently published novels. Jonathan Papernick, also the author of story collections The Ascent of Eli Israel and There Is No Other, agreed to answer a few questions about his writing and upcoming work!  Jonathan's fiction has appeared in numerous literary journals including, Nerve, Post Road, Green Mountains Review, and Night Train. Papernick has taught fiction writing at Pratt Institute, Brandeis University, Bar Ilan University, Emerson College, Grub Street Writers and Emerson College. A Toronto native, Papernick lives with his wife and two sons outside of Boston.

Q&A and Reading with Julian E. Zelizer

This Monday, March 23rdJulian E. Zelizer will launch his latest book, The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great SocietyJulian E. Zelizer is a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University and a fellow at New America. He is the author and editor of numerous books that examine U.S. political leaders, policies, and institutions since the New Deal, including Jimmy Carter and Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security—from World War II to the War on Terrorism. Zelizer is a well-known commentator on television and on radio and in print media. 


Q&A and Reading with Leah Umansky of Uptown Poets

Looking forward to the upcoming Uptown Poets Reading this Thursday, we are pleased to share our Q&A with poet Leah Umansky

Leah Umansky is the author of the Mad-Men inspired chapbook, Don Dreams and I Dream (Kattywompus Press, 2014) and a full-length collection, Domestic Uncertainties (BlazeVOX 2013). She is the curator of the COUPLET Reading Series in NYC, and writes for Tin House. Her poems can be seen in such places as Poetry Magazine, and The Brooklyn Rail, among others.

Q&A and Reading with Lewis Gordon

On Monday, April 20th, at 7pmLewis Gordon will read and discuss his latest book, What Fanon Said.  Drucilla CornellPaget HenryKyoo LeeDoug Ficekand Nelson Maldonado-Torres, will join the event as respondents.  

About What Fanon Said: 

Antiblack racism avows reason is white while emotion, and thus supposedly unreason, is black. Challenging academic adherence to this notion, What Fanon Said offers a portrait of Martinican-turned-Algerian revolutionary psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon as an exemplar of “living thought” against forms of reason marked by colonialism and racism. Working from his own translations of the original French texts, Gordon critically engages everything in Fanon from dialectics, ethics, existentialism, and humanism to philosophical anthropology, phenomenology, and political theory as well as psychiatry and psychoanalysis.