Staff Picks

Get Lost in Literature in Translation

lit in translation

In the throes of Ferrante fever? Enjoyed The Door as much as The New York Times? Then you just might be addicted to literature in translation! Surprisingly, only 3% of all novels published in the U.S. are in translation. But we are here to bridge the gap. Our new subscription program, Literature in Translation, features work from stellar authors and translators. Throughout the year indie bookseller Cari Kilbride will comb through a mix of translated classics and newly published books to choose a stand out novel to send every month. 

Guest Bookseller Recommendations: Feat. Tim O'Mara, Lee Child, Andrea Chapin, and Joshua Ferris

Small Business Saturday was on November 28. To help us celebrate, some local authors came in to work as guest booksellers. Lee Child, Time O'Mara, Andrea Chapin, and Joshua Ferris all had a chance to write their own "staff recommendations." See them below, and thanks to all who shopped small this weekend (and always)!

It's Women in Translation Month!

It's no secret that we love reading books in translation here at Book Culture. Anyone who spends time browsing the shelf talkers at the store will see that our favorite writers come from all over the world and write in many different languages. Though books in translation make up only 3% of all books published in any given year, they are some of the most exciting and memorable books out there, and we are grateful for the translators and publishers whose work allows us to read these amazing books.

Meet the Staff: Devon Dunn

Devon BioNow that you have met some of the wonderful people who work at Book Culture on Columbus, we are ready to introduce the staff at Book Culture's 112th store! There are quite a few of us, so look forward to many more posts, reading recommendations, and exclusive insights into the workings of an independent bookstore.

Mumtaz! Eight Arabic Literary Standouts All Book-Lovers Should Know

The Arabic word for “awesome,” mumtaz, comes from a root meaning “to divide” or “to distinguish,” and Arabic literature comprises a vast and diverse web of texts – composed in locales from Sudan to Jordan to Yemen, by litterateurs ranging from the eloquent Arabian poet-warriors of the 6th century to the realistic fiction writers of the nineteenth century to the brilliantly inventive contemporary writers whose work blasts apart genres – all distinguished by a passionate love for the Arabic language and its possibilities. Whatever your preconceptions about what Arabic literature is or isn’t, you surely don’t have the whole story!