Lost and Found: Treasures Between the Lines

From postcards and family photos to shopping lists and newspaper clippings, people will use just about anything for a bookmark. We acquire numerous used books through our buyback program, and with them come the fascinating, sentimental, and sometimes strange things that were left tucked inside. Here's a brief sampling of the hidden gems we've found over the years. Enjoy!

1. A friendly little note from "Harold Pinter" to President Bush:

"Dear Preisdent Bush, I'm sure you'll be having a nice little tea party with your fellow war criminal, Tony Blair. Please wash down the cucumbers down sandwiches down with a glass of blood with my compliments. Harold Pinter"

 

 

2. Notes and a book list for the summer 1953 session of Brooklyn College's English Lit. #329G class:

"English Lit. #329G - Med. Lit. ex. Chaucer

Summer Session 1953

Brooklyn College

(4) 1. The poets around Chaucer--imitations late and early-- the point here is delight in this life, tempered by Stoic rather than Christian fortitude; a. Apologies, moral tales for present conduct.

(2) 2. The Christian [impression] of this life and of the body in contrast to the Soul; the saints' lives; the ritual practices, indulgences, etc.

(3) 3. Wyclifite [sic] attack on the rites and asceticism of the Church; social reform; work vs. Church works;

(1) 4. Aruthurian Romance as pagan fertility religion carried on underground--not entirely unrelated to Lollandy; stress the figure Sir John Oldcastle as a Merlin persona; Courly love: Tristan and Yseult; Lancelot and Guinevere; the Passing of Arthur."

"SECONDARY READING for Med. Lit. exclu. Chaucer

1. The Portable Medieval Reader, ed. J.B. Ross and M.M. McLaughlin, New York: Viking Press, 1949. (Selections from med. historians.)

2. Trevelyan, G.M. Chaucer's England and the Early Tudors. Londont, etc., 1949.

3. Coulton, G.G. Mediaeval [sic] Panorama. London, 1938.

4. Thrapp, S. The Merchant Class of Medieval London, 1300-1500. Chicago, 1948.

5. Denomy, A.J. The Heresy of Courtly Love. New York, 1947.

6. Rickert, E. (compiler). Chaucer's World. New York, 1948.

7. R.S. Loomis. Celtic Myth and Arthurian Romance. New York, 1927.

8. J. Weston. From Ritual to Romance. New York, 1941. (1st ed., London, 1920.)"

3. A cherished newspaper clipping:

"Wife punches husband to death

Cairo, Monday

A middle-aged Cairo woman killed her husband with a single punch and then pretended he had died of natural causes, security sources said today. They said the 43-year-old woman confessed to police that she flattened her 66-year-old husband, a retired civil servant, with a blow to the face after a quarrel. When she realised he was dead, the woman persuaded a health inspector that her husband, a diabetic, had died naturally. He issued a death certificate without odering a post-morent. But the woman feuded with neighbours, who later told police they had heard the couple quarrelling before the husband's death. Police orded the body to be exumed and a post-moretem to be conducted. The wife was remanded in custody. (Reuters)"

4. And finally, this lovely card from a mother to her son:

Dear [retracted]

I feel like I never helped you or educated you at all, regarding sex. That is something I might have been better at discussing if you were a girl! I don't know if you got enough support from the men in your life, or school, but I collected a few books which I hope might be helpful. I personally do not feel extremely qualified to talk about sex, except that it is very misused and misunderstood by society--by Hollywood, by the media. The biggest thing I'm aware of is that there is nothing to prove. People are so identified with their bodies, they think they are that--so I honestly hate to give you all this as it is one more thing to 'deconstruct' in the end--but anyway, maybe some of it will be helpful. Anytime you want any info. or support, know I'm there for you--Love, Mom"