Black Patience: Performance, Civil Rights, and the Unfinished Project of Emancipation (Performance and American Cultures) (Paperback)

Black Patience: Performance, Civil Rights, and the Unfinished Project of Emancipation (Performance and American Cultures) By Julius B. Fleming Jr Cover Image
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Description


A bold rethinking of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of Black theater

"Freedom, Now " This rallying cry became the most iconic phrase of the Civil Rights Movement, challenging the persistent command that Black people wait--in the holds of slave ships and on auction blocks, in segregated bus stops and schoolyards--for their long-deferred liberation.

In Black Patience, Julius B. Fleming Jr. argues that, during the Civil Rights Movement, Black artists and activists used theater to energize this radical refusal to wait. Participating in a vibrant culture of embodied political performance that ranged from marches and sit-ins to jail-ins and speeches, these artists turned to theater to unsettle a violent racial project that Fleming refers to as "Black patience." Inviting the likes of James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Alice Childress, Douglas Turner Ward, Duke Ellington, and Oscar Brown Jr. to the stage, Black Patience illuminates how Black artists and activists of the Civil Rights era used theater to expose, critique, and repurpose structures of white supremacy. In this bold rethinking of the Civil Rights Movement, Fleming contends that Black theatrical performance was a vital technology of civil rights activism, and a crucial site of Black artistic and cultural production.

About the Author


Julius B. Fleming Jr. is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he specializes in African American literary and cultural production and performance studies.
Product Details
ISBN: 9781479806843
ISBN-10: 1479806846
Publisher: New York University Press
Publication Date: March 29th, 2022
Pages: 312
Language: English
Series: Performance and American Cultures